A Newcomer’s guide to “Staying Warm under $200” in Canadian Winter (Toronto edition)

Since I moved to Toronto in summer ’16, the only thing that’s been playing on my mind is how to face the legendary Canadian Winter. From the freezing cold to the woeful wind, Canada has been successful in offering the most notorious winters for years in succession.

Of course, you hear about snowstorms and bone-chilling wind in other parts of the northern hemisphere but Canada is perhaps the next best to being in the arctics in person. In fact, half of the country enjoys an almost Artic-like winter already.

While I resorted to the usual Google Search for “Winter clothes in Canada”, one name kept flooding the results; Canada Goose. The almost-legendary “Made in Canada” brand has enjoyed a loyal fan following over the years and has recently become a fashion icon for the rest of the world. Themed around functional premium winter wear, Canada Goose’s success has made way for more fashion-themed premium brands like Nobis, Moose Knuckles, Rudsak and so on. But being a new immigrant without a job in a country where just about 90% people live paycheck-to-paycheck, $900 just didnt seem like a feasible investment.

Apart from price, another crucial part of the game was the length of your outerwear. In Asia for example, a jacket runs up to your waist and a coat up to your hip (or shorter in modern cuts). Since overcoats or topcoats are rare in this region, I naturally only brought the standard-sized items from home.

Once in Canada though, it’s a different story. You get parka, fishtail parka, bomber jacket, mid-length jacket, jackets that sit below the hip to jackets that run down to your knees. There are literally endless combinations depending on how much coverage you are looking for and what look you are after (utilitarian vs. fashionista). It’s delightful and dizzying.

Since I love getting to the depths of any topic, my research on winterwear was no different. The next three months were spent gleefully on buying and trying almost a dozen jackets. And while they all contributed to my understanding of winterwear, almost all of them were returned back to the stores.

Why were they returned? And which one finally made it to the closet? Read on.

First, the list of jackets/parkas I ordered, tried and returned before finalizing my winterwear for 2016-17.

  1. Columbia Bugaboo Interchange Jacket A 3-in-1 jacket system with synthetic insulation. Runs larger than its mentioned size. I am one of those critiques who think the 3-in-1  shell and insulating layer quality is compromised in some way or other to ensure you get 2 jackets for the price of one in an affordable package. Columbia pricing varies greatly across retailers and during SALE events so keep a watchful eye out if buying. Their Regular Fit (which is just about everything they make) is bulky and definitely not my cup of tea. Returned
  2. Columbia Mount Tabor Insulated Jacket Very affordable option for a winter jacket (the only close competition I could think of is MEC Frostbreaker at almost twice the price). Synthetic insulation and typical Columbia design (boxy and boring). Fits surprisingly well (with space for a mid layer). Its jacket-sized length won’t cover anywhere beyond the waist. Got it at a super bargain of $71 at Sears. Didn’t get the color I was looking for, so Returned
  3. Gap ColdControl Max Snorkel Coat First true parka I tried. Primaloft synthetic insulation (which is gold-standard in synthetic insulations), long enough and has the right set of features. The term”snorkel coat” was added to my winter vocabulary (more in detail about it later). The hood can run a bit large. Order your regular size as there is enough space for mid-layers built in. Please note, every Gap product, best to wait for a Gapcash event as they easily offer up to 40% off without any BIG SALE event (not worth buying at MRP level). Got mine at $142 when MRP was $208. Returned
  4. Forever21 Hooded Utility Jacket Whimsical purchase but a very sleek design after all. Bomber style arm pockets with a useful hood and water repellent zipper. However, the quality of Forever21 products is a big no-no for me. Their stiching, zips and material can be very below acceptable standards as they are more a budget fashion retailer at the end. Prices vary greatly over time so be wary of buyer’s dissonance. I bought this at $60+ only to see it become $30 in a month’s time. Returned
  5. MEC Wicklow Jacket First experience with the Canadian superbrand MEC. Used the 3-in-1 jacket experience to order a separate jacket for Fall/Spring season. Loved the cotton-like polyester feel. However, the hood cannot be removed and the lack of any insulation failed to keep it sold eventually. A good field jacket wannabe if you are on the lookout for that style at an affordable price (Clearance price $70). Returned
  6. MEC Steadfaster Jacket A true multi-season and multi-occasion jacket – waterproof, light insulation, long, removable insulated hood with a minimalist urban-ready design. Somehow the zips are too difficult to operate, but everything else is in its right place. Excellent waterproofing and windproofing throughout. Can be coupled with a down mid-layer for winter operation (did exactly that in -19c the other day and was just fine). Do wait for MEC‘s Annual Clearance Event for buying it though. Got the $195 jacket at $120. Loving it
  7. MEC Berring Parka Synthetic insulation parka. Great quality. However, like Gap, sizes run big with MEC as well. Hands would inevitably run longer than usual (which may not be a bad thing as it works as a cover between the gloves and cuff). Had difficulty finding the right fit for myself and more importantly black wasn’t on sale. It’s their best synthetic insulation outerwear (much better than Frostbreaker). But just like other MEC products MRP is too high ($285 vs. $170), so wait for CLEARANCE.  Returned
  8. Uniqlo Warm Tech Down Coat (called Ultra Warm Down Coat in Uniqlo Canada) First of my Japanese winter wear experiments. Uniqlo partnered with a 3rd party winter gear specialist to develop this bad boy. Very very warm feeling. The fit is clearly a size larger than what it says.  For me, even the SMALL was looking bulky after wearing a blazer inside. Styled after the infamous N-3B military parka (which is not a bad thing for classic fashion enthusiasts). Runs up to the waist. The buttons in front are a nightmare to operate with gloves, though. Has down but I am not too sure about the quality of down. Important to note – although it retails for $249, you can get it at $149 during BIG SALE events like Boxing Day or Black Friday. Used it a few days but wasn’t too pleased with the length, front button arrangement and the hood. Returned
  9. Muji Water Repellent Down Coat Muji is a brand I like associating with. Although I barely have bought anything from them over the years, I am somehow drawn to them just like a Tomica car. A random discovery while window shopping. Retail price was too much for me so I waited for a SALE. Got it at 30% off and still felt too expensive (came around $208). Was down to 50% in a few days during the year-end SALE (without any Black ones though). 90% duck down, long, snorkel-style hood (reduces visibility but excellent wind chill protection), typical Muji minimalism in design. Stitching could be better but the material and build feel solid. I feel it will be serving for years to come. The only thing I dislike is the hood being non-removable and a pointless tie down inside gaiter that serves no purpose. Loving it

While many individuals in my place would settle for an all-purpose established brands like Columbia, North Face. Most actually end up with a Canada Weather Gear from International Clothiers (hearing of their gimmicky Super Triple Goose Down blend. A Canada Goose wannabe) or Alpinetek from Sears (IMO better than Canada Weather Gear but still another Canada Goose knock-off) or Canadiana from Walmart. There is also Firefly which seems to be extremely popular in the women’s segment. But since I settled for two as opposed to one (Muji and MEC) as my weapon of choice for this winter, the curious reader wonders why?

Firstly, I don’t understand why people are wearing their heavy-duty parkas every time there is a light cool breeze in Fall (yet to see Spring). Heavy jackets are heavily insulated for a reason and that’s for frigid winter and not a cool fall afternoon. A fall/spring jacket is a must for a Tronotonian’s wardrobe and mine is the MEC Steadfaster Jacket.

Secondly, a winter jacket (in my opinion) should have a few must-haves –

  • A decent-sized hood (best if removable). An absolute must if it’s in a city which has severe wind chill like Toronto. Beanies/toques are can do double duty but not enough on its own.
  • A workable fur lining (Coyote or Artifical = Animal lover vs. Tight budget)
  • A trustworthy insulation (best if goose down but a duck down will do too). If going for synthetic insulation, best to read up on it as there are many brands with different standards (e.g. Primaloft, Thermoball, Hyperloft, Thinsulate etc). Some useful reads on this are mentioned below.
  • Body coverage or length of the jacket. This really depends on your usage actually. A parka traditionally is longer than a jacket because it covers almost up to your knees (always in a women’s model). However, a lengthy top wear is going to be limit movement and seating (this where two-way zips come to good use, so do look out for this feature). For me personally, long jacket/parka is a must as I would want my legs to be equally protected since I don’t wear any snow pant or wind-blocking bottom layer.
  • Pockets and Hand warmers. With a thick warm glove (even more with a mitten) your mobility is greatly limited so please do make sure the outside-accessible pockets work for you. At least one inside pocket is required for phones or even wallet. Great if you get a hand warmer pocket as well cause then you might be able to make do with a thinner glove.
  • Lining. A useful tip on lining – make sure you try the jacket/parka on with both formal wears as well as a wool-blend mid-layer as the lining can be a make or break for many. A smooth polyester lining means easy on and off while a cotton or fur-lining would not only mean difficulty in putting it on but also runs the risk of leaving residue on your formals.
  • Price. At the end of the day, its all about the cost of ownership. I am not suggesting you buy nothing less than a Canada Goose but spending on a decent winter outerwear is a must in a cold country like Canada. All the models suggested here can be obtained for a less than $200 budget. As one shopkeeper kindly explained to me at Sportchek, a decent synthetic down jacket shouldn’t be less than $150-$200 while a workable down jacket isn’t below $300.

And I could find all of the above in my final selection, the Muji Water Repellant Down Coat.

That said I got lucky with my Muji but I strongly recommend The North Face McMurdo Parka at around $300-$350 and Columbia Barlow Pass Jacket between $225-$275 both with 550 down fill which is more than enough.

Now with the Fall/Spring Jacket and Winter Parka resting in my wardrobe, over the coming Winter months, I will try to post a few pictures of both my Muji Parka and MEC Jacket in use. And if time and patience permits, even do a piece on the other two essentials for a gentleman in Toronto – dress professionally with an overcoat and layering it right.

Till then, enjoy the chill at your will!

 

*All amounts are in Canadian Dollars.

Useful Reads

  1. Down vs. Synthetic at Sierra Trading Post
  2. Down vs. Synthetic at Backcountry
  3. Down vs. Synthetic at REI
  4. How to Choose the Best Down Jacket For a good idea on fill power/CUIN
  5. The Snorkel Coat (a type of Parka)
  6. Parka (Snorkel, Fishtail etc.)
  7. Splurge with a Canadian Winter-ready Premium Jacket Sneak peek of the very best

 

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Big on Small Screen, again!

Half a decade later, I am back on TV.

In 2010, it was #RideonTheTop on #ETV speaking about “Air Action by Mentos Launch Campaign”.

In 2016, I was invited to speak on the “Digital Marketing in Digital Bangladesh” on #YoungNite of #ATNNews

Felt more like a “coming of age” compare & contrast.
A boy had become a man.
An amateur to an expert.

In 2010, I was thinking creative in advertising working for Ogilvy & Mather
In 2016, I am drawing blue maps in digital services working for Robi Axiata

Still a very much thinker but also a part time blogger. Enjoy!

Carry Geeking: Goruck meets Maxpedition

Having lugged around my Goruck GR0 for almost a year now, I was looking at different Goruck-branded accessories to expand the capabilities of the venerable “One Ruck to Rule Them All“. In 2015, my Goruck GR0 was renamed as GR1 21L for reasons most likely to be economies of scale in terms of “brand awareness”. I have long wondered why two similar featured rucks “The Original” GR1 and the smaller GR0 need to co-exist as their key differentiator was human-size (over or under 6ft tall). IMG_20150916_144523fullyloaded-goruck-gr0-with-a-oneofakind-bangladeshflag-flagpatch--thanks-to-peak69-for-this-wonderful-patch-mycountrymypride_21726814049_o fullystuffed-goruck-gr0-edc-pimpinblack-carrygeeking_21923396491_o

Longer than my love for tactical backpacks, I’ve been a sucker for waist bags. Yes, it is what many of you might associate with a bum bag or a fanny pack. Having seen my ex Army dad believing in modularity and practicality over fashion and looking good, I also grew a strong fascination for one from an early age. So thanks to Aliexpress, I got the opportunity to get my hands on a Maxpedition Octa Versipack look-alike (most probably made by the same Chinese factory but marketed under Free Soldier brand).

IMG-20150425-WA000020160131_001824

While I had gone on to buy two more waist bags for other needs, I had actually put this one up for sale on a classifieds site. Thanks to not getting any good offers, I started thinking about to get rid of it.

And as I prepared to put it in a pack for a giveaway, I had one of those “eureka moments”. Why not combine the both and expand the usage capabilities of the Goruck.

I didn’t or couldn’t wait for MOLLE attachment clips to arrive nor was I going to spend extra on it. A few feet of paracord and fewer minutes of careful binding later, I had this in hand…IMG_20160131_01102620160131_005811Amazed by my new creation, I think this makes for a perfect Grab ‘n Go bag combination using a Goruck.

So here goes my shoutout to all Goruck fanboys out there, what do you think?

2 Years On: A review of the BLACKHAWK! 3-Day Assault Pack

Its been a little over two years since I snapped the following photo of my primary gear for one-bag travelling, the BLACKHAWK! 3-Day Assault Pack.2013-07-29 01.01.30

And after having been through a near-death experience in Nepal, travels through Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand) and road trips across Bangladesh; I can safely say the decision was RIGHT!!!

Blackhawk 3-Day Assault Pack
First travel abroad, Kuala Lumpur MY

The 1000 denier Cordura (which I only got to understand about during the purchase of this bag and have only bought Cordura stuff ever since) actually turned out to be a cheaper look-alike called Kodra (Made in America vs. Made in Korea); the zippers were all ORIGINAL burly YKK #10s and the buckles were made by Woojin plastics (think, poor man’s ITW Nexus buckles). After over two years of travel use (I do travel quite a bit though), everything is exactly like the way I opened its packaging except zips have gotten smoother and the nylon feels softer.

IMG_20140729_122431
Off to Nepal

Ever since I bought the 3DAP, there has been a lot of hue and cry over the venerable Goruck GR2, the innovative Mystery Ranch 3DAP or Camelbak Trizip and the TAD Fast Pack, where all have claimed the throne of being the best tactical carry on compatible backpack in the world. However in a price vs. feature chart or even a look vs. functionality chart; I doubt there is any comparison of the BLACKHAWK!

Malaysia this time
Malaysia this time

Costing less than $100 in most seasons, the BLACKHAWK! is one-fourth the price of a Goruck GR2 (acknowledged to be one of the best carry on compatible backpacks that is also tacticool) and also international travel compatible 9Goruck recently releases a 34L version to make that cut). At 37-liters, not only the Blackhawk happens to be a better sized bag, its teardrop shape also looks sexier!

Just look at that sexy bag!

Since the BLACKHAWK! I’ve become a bigger carrygeek than before having purchased bags from famous carry brands like Eastpak, Greenroom136, Gregory, Osprey, North Face, Maxpedition, Defy and lastly Goruck (yes, those $200+  backpacks of Goruck) but the one that started it all was this one.

I haven’t done bag reviews before. Actually no written reviews ever. But the darth of good reviews for such a wonderful bag got to me to write a few words. If you are in the market for a good carry on compatible, laptop-friendly (the front pouch is perfect fit for a 14″ pc/15″ macbook) and sturdy backpack; look no further!!!

Who is it for? People looking for one bag to rule them all. Who understands how a durable travel bag matters and doesn’t want to look too tacticool in a shopping mall.

Who it is not for? Wants a cushioned soft carry experience (1000d is not for them) or just carrying around too much cash in hand.

Peace 🙂

Marking Bangladesh: A Road Trip

Ever since the news of Dhaka-Shillong-Guwahati bus service hit the headlines, a long lost dream was peeking out of the bucket list of this wanderlust soul. How enriching would it be to actually to a tour of Bangladesh using nothing but Indian soil.

Thanks to dear Google Maps and my earlier trips to Northeast India (Shillong and Darjeeling in 2007) it was rather easy to come up with a tentative travel route.


Starting from Dhaka, I wanted to to cover the three sides of Bangladesh that are bordering India and touch all the major cities in between. The cities that popped up in my initial list are as following,

  1. Agatala (Site of the infamous Agartala Conspiracy aka. Birth of Bangladesh)
  2. Silchar (a predominantly Sylheti Bangla speaking city. Go figure!)
  3. Shillong (Scotland of the East also happens to be the Rock Capital of India)
  4. Guwahati (City of Temples esp. the one of Sex Goddess)
  5. Siliguri (A stopover unless we add a journey on Toy Train or visit Pseudo Tibet)
  6. Kolkata (Need I say more?)

The trip should be possible to pack is a 2 week holiday and ends with a direct bus from Kolkata to Dhaka. I would think the experience would be best if it is a pure road trip (with as little interference of private transportation as possible, depending on the group size). And there are established bus services for all the intercity travelling I just mentioned in the list.

So before your friend from India can actually make a Kolkata-Dhaka-Tripura trip, and complete the aforementioned road trip a reality (and for surely they will); I am inviting fellow adventure-minded folks (notice I avoided adventurers) to join in to make this trip a reality!!!

Cheers to some #souldsearching and #contemptment while enjoying one mother of a #roadtrip

PS. I am open to suggestions on the Cities/Places to visit.

Carry Geek 1.0

Bags2

My bag collection in collage. Clockwise in random order,

  1. Office Carry: Topo Designs Mountain Briefcase (Description | Review)
  2. Carry On: Wildcraft Techpack 45 Backpack (Description | Review)
  3. Casual Buddy: Gregory Kletter Day Daypack (Description | Review)
  4. Casual Buddy: Eastpak Out of Office (Description | Review) SOLD!
  5. One Night Stand: Gap Barrel Duffel (Description | Review)
  6. Carry On: Blackhawk 3-Day Assault Pack (Description | Review)
  7. Office Carry: Greenroom136 Bootstrap (Description | Review) SOLD!

Mastering the Digital with Michael Leander: Part 2

Day 2 was much more engaging and useful. Many thanks to Mr. Leander for that. Although I felt he was having a real hard time managing time through the 2-day workshop, his honesty and transparency about it was admirable.

On to other things, the greatest learning in this workshop was CBM as a concept. Without a doubt, we, the digitally nerd generation speak of CPICPC, CTR and CPM as often as LOL and YOLO. But it was the discovery of the acronym CBM is what really got my attention this time.

Thanks to my years in advertising (with one of the best agencies in the world) and subsequent career in telecom marketing, I am not alien to the concept of #sexsells. However the crude representation of this universal idea (even as a #hashtag) was at time uneasy (if not uncomfortable) to point out in lengthy brainstorming sessions involving respected members of the opposite gender.

Cleavage Based Marketing or CBM (not to be confused with Content Marketing although Content = Cleavage is true) however is a more acceptable and scientific way of saying what the Father of Modern Advertising has been saying for almost half a century now. #exposetoexcite

Thanks to oodles of eye-tracking studies and an unconscious evolutionary drive prompting us to activate powerful bonding circuits that help create a loving, nurturing bond (more commonly referred to as libido), we now know that the greatest marketing tool available to mankind is #thecleavage.

And in case my reader is a lady who thinks women don’t practice #objectifyinggaze; according to similar eye-tracking studies, you are just as guilty as the man standing next to you!!!

Mastering the Digital with Michael Leander: Part 1

So I am attending this Certified Digital Masterclass with the famous (or said to be so) Mr. Micheal Leander. Its a 2-day workshop organized by (the not so good) Bangladesh Brand Forum is supposed to make me a master of,

  1. Knowing how to create a killer website
  2. Understand basics of SEO marketing
  3. Engaging the audience with content marketing
  4. Planning effective campaigns for just about everything

Well first thing first, the Day 1 was seldom interesting and more often yawning. However the day did have its peaks with 8-Second Rule of First Impressions (original article to be found here) as well as mapping my morning actions in exact sequence on a piece of paper. The later was of particular interest as it unleashed the schizophrenic OCD side of me. The list on paper looked something like this,

Initial scribble

Back home in the luxury of my room. I went back to the list to make it into a proper mind map (yes, I can get really stupidly obsessive at times). Using this new tool text2mindmap was a welcome change over my usual choice of coggle, and I fancied the map to be more methodical.

So ladies and gentlemen, I present to you MY MORNING!!!!

My morning map

Shalom 🙂